A Leader of Lithium Lifepo4 Battery in China Since 2006

Mom warns other parents after son swallows lithium batteryMom warns other parents after son swallows lithium batteryMom warns other parents after son swallows lithium battery

by:GSL ENERGY     2020-06-13
ELMIRA —
You can\'t think of anything as a busy parent.
Your child is sitting on his high chair and when you prepare his afternoon snacks, you ask him to play with the remote control or other electronic devices in the kitchen.
That\'s what Nicole Wright is.
But a few seconds later,
Tragedy happened.
In her 11-month-
Wright\'s old son, Brendan, warned other parents that it was dangerous for babies or toddlers to play with remote controls or other electronic devices equipped with lithium batteries.
Wright was relieved because Brendan was recovering.
But just over a week ago, he almost lost his life in the pediatric intensive care unit at McMaster Children\'s Hospital.
At the beginning, Wright tied Brenden to the high chair and gave him a few small rice cakes to appease him, while she cut him a mango as a snack for the afternoon.
Brenden was making a fuss, so she asked him to play with the remote control in the kitchen.
Wright never thought of anything.
Babies love remote control, cordless phones and other similar devices.
Also, this special remote control is hard to turn on
It used to be hard for her and her husband to figure out how to turn the battery on.
She never thought the baby would open it.
\"I think he must have hit it in the right way,\" she said now . \".
But she didn\'t realize he turned it on and didn\'t see him stuffing the battery into his mouth.
Then, all of a sudden, she heard Brenden make a gging sound.
Wright was trained in some care and CPR, and she immediately pulled the baby off the high chair and removed what he had swallowed according to the procedure, but nothing came out.
At first, she thought the cookies might have gone the wrong way.
But it doesn\'t make sense because it\'s a cookie made for the baby, so it should dissolve in his mouth.
It wasn\'t until she pulled him off his high chair that she realized that the back of the remote control was on, lithium battery --
Round flat battery coin size-was missing.
She shouted frantically to her sister that she was in the house with Wright\'s two childrenyear-old daughter.
She had a neighbor who happened to be a caregiver, so she flew to their house with her baby in her arms.
At this time, Brenden turned blue and his neighbor hit 911.
By the time the ambulance arrived, the battery in Brenden\'s throat had been transferred, so he got the air.
But even though he had been vomiting at this point, the battery still didn\'t come out.
Wright was in the emergency department of Dahe hospital and realized how terrible the situation was. An X-
Ray found the battery stuck in his esophagus, but it was tricky to remove the battery even for the doctor.
They tried to get it out in the operating room of the Rio Grande River but \"it was a little too low, too swollen, and they were afraid to go through the tissue and cause more trauma.
\"A special instrument is needed to take it out and he needs to be transferred to the hospital in Hamilton.
But the transfer itself is tricky because they have to make sure he is in perfect shape.
Even minor movements can cause the battery to move again and block the airway.
It was too windy to take him to Hamilton by helicopter, so they had to have the intensive care unit paramedics drive him to McMaster from Toronto.
It seems to take a long time for Wright, who now realizes that the poison control department has told the doctor \"they have to get it out as soon as possible.
\"In order to paralyze Brenden, he took a drug so that he would not move during transportation.
The drug caused his heart rate to drop, Wright said, and he began to stop his heart beat, but luckily, \"It lasted only a few seconds . \".
She was terrified when she watched the nurse enter and leave his room.
Finally, they put him in an ambulance and sent him to McMaster shortly after midnight, taking him into the operating room.
At this point, the battery has been placed in his esophagus for more than nine hours.
These lithium batteries can pass through the esophagus in just two hours. At 1 a. m.
Dr. McMaster came out of the operating room.
\"We were told they took it out, but he had threeand-a-half -
He had a centimeter burn in his esophagus.
\"Even so, he didn\'t leave the woods because they had to wait until the swelling and trauma subsided before they could have a swallowing test and see X-more clearly-ray.
Finally, four days after the beginning of the torture, they were able to do this and make sure the doctor could not see the perforation.
Brenden is now discharged from the hospital, although he is still eating purple food due to the need to cure the burn.
The sound carries some damage, but the doctor hopes it will heal.
To further assess the loss, he had two follow-up visits in the hospital.
Since then, Wright has found a lot of information on the dangers of lithium batteries on the Internet, as well as stories of children who died from swallowing lithium batteries.
Battery maker Energizer cooperates with global safe children, including safe children in Canada, to carry out battery control activities to remind parents and other caregivers of the danger of swallowing lithium batteries.
The website warns parents that saliva triggers current when the battery is stuck in the child\'s throat.
Once the combustion reaction begins, it can continue even after the battery is taken out.
This is not a rare accident.
Each year, more than 3,500 cases of Button Battery swallowing of various sizes and types are reported to the United StatesS.
Poisoning control center
Between 2006 and 2010, cases of children who died or were seriously injured increased by four times as more household items now contain lithium batteries.
Wright is telling her story because when she says she talks to her parents, they don\'t know how dangerous it is.
\"I feel like we want to do that if we can stop another child from going through this,\" she said . \".
It\'s dangerous to swallow batteries, but the biggest danger is coins.
\"They are small enough to be swallowed, but big enough to get stuck,\" she added . \".
Brenden was lucky.
Many children need to be hospitalized and operated for several months.
Every year, some children die from swallowing lithium batteries.
In some cases, parents do not even know that the child has swallowed the battery until the child is ill.
When the battery is found, it has burned a hole through the esophagus or stomach.
So Wright was very pleased and grateful.
\"When you read that it can burn a hole in two hours in real time, I can\'t believe we left him here, and he started to try to walk again and do his normal thing, \"she said.
Rsimone @ township enterprises. com ELMIRA —
You can\'t think of anything as a busy parent.
Your child is sitting on his high chair and when you prepare his afternoon snacks, you ask him to play with the remote control or other electronic devices in the kitchen.
That\'s what Nicole Wright is.
But a few seconds later,
Tragedy happened.
In her 11-month-
Wright\'s old son, Brendan, warned other parents that it was dangerous for babies or toddlers to play with remote controls or other electronic devices equipped with lithium batteries.
Wright was relieved because Brendan was recovering.
But just over a week ago, he almost lost his life in the pediatric intensive care unit at McMaster Children\'s Hospital.
At the beginning, Wright tied Brenden to the high chair and gave him a few small rice cakes to appease him, while she cut him a mango as a snack for the afternoon.
Brenden was making a fuss, so she asked him to play with the remote control in the kitchen.
Wright never thought of anything.
Babies love remote control, cordless phones and other similar devices.
Also, this special remote control is hard to turn on
It used to be hard for her and her husband to figure out how to turn the battery on.
She never thought the baby would open it.
\"I think he must have hit it in the right way,\" she said now . \".
But she didn\'t realize he turned it on and didn\'t see him stuffing the battery into his mouth.
Then, all of a sudden, she heard Brenden make a gging sound.
Wright was trained in some care and CPR, and she immediately pulled the baby off the high chair and removed what he had swallowed according to the procedure, but nothing came out.
At first, she thought the cookies might have gone the wrong way.
But it doesn\'t make sense because it\'s a cookie made for the baby, so it should dissolve in his mouth.
It wasn\'t until she pulled him off his high chair that she realized that the back of the remote control was on, lithium battery --
Round flat battery coin size-was missing.
She shouted frantically to her sister that she was in the house with Wright\'s two childrenyear-old daughter.
She had a neighbor who happened to be a caregiver, so she flew to their house with her baby in her arms.
At this time, Brenden turned blue and his neighbor hit 911.
By the time the ambulance arrived, the battery in Brenden\'s throat had been transferred, so he got the air.
But even though he had been vomiting at this point, the battery still didn\'t come out.
Wright was in the emergency department of Dahe hospital and realized how terrible the situation was. An X-
Ray found the battery stuck in his esophagus, but it was tricky to remove the battery even for the doctor.
They tried to get it out in the operating room of the Rio Grande River but \"it was a little too low, too swollen, and they were afraid to go through the tissue and cause more trauma.
\"A special instrument is needed to take it out and he needs to be transferred to the hospital in Hamilton.
But the transfer itself is tricky because they have to make sure he is in perfect shape.
Even minor movements can cause the battery to move again and block the airway.
It was too windy to take him to Hamilton by helicopter, so they had to have the intensive care unit paramedics drive him to McMaster from Toronto.
It seems to take a long time for Wright, who now realizes that the poison control department has told the doctor \"they have to get it out as soon as possible.
\"In order to paralyze Brenden, he took a drug so that he would not move during transportation.
The drug caused his heart rate to drop, Wright said, and he began to stop his heart beat, but luckily, \"It lasted only a few seconds . \".
She was terrified when she watched the nurse enter and leave his room.
Finally, they put him in an ambulance and sent him to McMaster shortly after midnight, taking him into the operating room.
At this point, the battery has been placed in his esophagus for more than nine hours.
These lithium batteries can pass through the esophagus in just two hours. At 1 a. m.
Dr. McMaster came out of the operating room.
\"We were told they took it out, but he had threeand-a-half -
He had a centimeter burn in his esophagus.
\"Even so, he didn\'t leave the woods because they had to wait until the swelling and trauma subsided before they could have a swallowing test and see X-more clearly-ray.
Finally, four days after the beginning of the torture, they were able to do this and make sure the doctor could not see the perforation.
Brenden is now discharged from the hospital, although he is still eating purple food due to the need to cure the burn.
The sound carries some damage, but the doctor hopes it will heal.
To further assess the loss, he had two follow-up visits in the hospital.
Since then, Wright has found a lot of information on the dangers of lithium batteries on the Internet, as well as stories of children who died from swallowing lithium batteries.
Battery maker Energizer cooperates with global safe children, including safe children in Canada, to carry out battery control activities to remind parents and other caregivers of the danger of swallowing lithium batteries.
The website warns parents that saliva triggers current when the battery is stuck in the child\'s throat.
Once the combustion reaction begins, it can continue even after the battery is taken out.
This is not a rare accident.
Each year, more than 3,500 cases of Button Battery swallowing of various sizes and types are reported to the United StatesS.
Poisoning control center
Between 2006 and 2010, cases of children who died or were seriously injured increased by four times as more household items now contain lithium batteries.
Wright is telling her story because when she says she talks to her parents, they don\'t know how dangerous it is.
\"I feel like we want to do that if we can stop another child from going through this,\" she said . \".
It\'s dangerous to swallow batteries, but the biggest danger is coins.
\"They are small enough to be swallowed, but big enough to get stuck,\" she added . \".
Brenden was lucky.
Many children need to be hospitalized and operated for several months.
Every year, some children die from swallowing lithium batteries.
In some cases, parents do not even know that the child has swallowed the battery until the child is ill.
When the battery is found, it has burned a hole through the esophagus or stomach.
So Wright was very pleased and grateful.
\"When you read that it can burn a hole in two hours in real time, I can\'t believe we left him here, and he started to try to walk again and do his normal thing, \"she said.
Rsimone @ township enterprises. com ELMIRA —
You can\'t think of anything as a busy parent.
Your child is sitting on his high chair and when you prepare his afternoon snacks, you ask him to play with the remote control or other electronic devices in the kitchen.
That\'s what Nicole Wright is.
But a few seconds later,
Tragedy happened.
In her 11-month-
Wright\'s old son, Brendan, warned other parents that it was dangerous for babies or toddlers to play with remote controls or other electronic devices equipped with lithium batteries.
Wright was relieved because Brendan was recovering.
But just over a week ago, he almost lost his life in the pediatric intensive care unit at McMaster Children\'s Hospital.
At the beginning, Wright tied Brenden to the high chair and gave him a few small rice cakes to appease him, while she cut him a mango as a snack for the afternoon.
Brenden was making a fuss, so she asked him to play with the remote control in the kitchen.
Wright never thought of anything.
Babies love remote control, cordless phones and other similar devices.
Also, this special remote control is hard to turn on
It used to be hard for her and her husband to figure out how to turn the battery on.
She never thought the baby would open it.
\"I think he must have hit it in the right way,\" she said now . \".
But she didn\'t realize he turned it on and didn\'t see him stuffing the battery into his mouth.
Then, all of a sudden, she heard Brenden make a gging sound.
Wright was trained in some care and CPR, and she immediately pulled the baby off the high chair and removed what he had swallowed according to the procedure, but nothing came out.
At first, she thought the cookies might have gone the wrong way.
But it doesn\'t make sense because it\'s a cookie made for the baby, so it should dissolve in his mouth.
It wasn\'t until she pulled him off his high chair that she realized that the back of the remote control was on, lithium battery --
Round flat battery coin size-was missing.
She shouted frantically to her sister that she was in the house with Wright\'s two childrenyear-old daughter.
She had a neighbor who happened to be a caregiver, so she flew to their house with her baby in her arms.
At this time, Brenden turned blue and his neighbor hit 911.
By the time the ambulance arrived, the battery in Brenden\'s throat had been transferred, so he got the air.
But even though he had been vomiting at this point, the battery still didn\'t come out.
Wright was in the emergency department of Dahe hospital and realized how terrible the situation was. An X-
Ray found the battery stuck in his esophagus, but it was tricky to remove the battery even for the doctor.
They tried to get it out in the operating room of the Rio Grande River but \"it was a little too low, too swollen, and they were afraid to go through the tissue and cause more trauma.
\"A special instrument is needed to take it out and he needs to be transferred to the hospital in Hamilton.
But the transfer itself is tricky because they have to make sure he is in perfect shape.
Even minor movements can cause the battery to move again and block the airway.
It was too windy to take him to Hamilton by helicopter, so they had to have the intensive care unit paramedics drive him to McMaster from Toronto.
It seems to take a long time for Wright, who now realizes that the poison control department has told the doctor \"they have to get it out as soon as possible.
\"In order to paralyze Brenden, he took a drug so that he would not move during transportation.
The drug caused his heart rate to drop, Wright said, and he began to stop his heart beat, but luckily, \"It lasted only a few seconds . \".
She was terrified when she watched the nurse enter and leave his room.
Finally, they put him in an ambulance and sent him to McMaster shortly after midnight, taking him into the operating room.
At this point, the battery has been placed in his esophagus for more than nine hours.
These lithium batteries can pass through the esophagus in just two hours. At 1 a. m.
Dr. McMaster came out of the operating room.
\"We were told they took it out, but he had threeand-a-half -
He had a centimeter burn in his esophagus.
\"Even so, he didn\'t leave the woods because they had to wait until the swelling and trauma subsided before they could have a swallowing test and see X-more clearly-ray.
Finally, four days after the beginning of the torture, they were able to do this and make sure the doctor could not see the perforation.
Brenden is now discharged from the hospital, although he is still eating purple food due to the need to cure the burn.
The sound carries some damage, but the doctor hopes it will heal.
To further assess the loss, he had two follow-up visits in the hospital.
Since then, Wright has found a lot of information on the dangers of lithium batteries on the Internet, as well as stories of children who died from swallowing lithium batteries.
Battery maker Energizer cooperates with global safe children, including safe children in Canada, to carry out battery control activities to remind parents and other caregivers of the danger of swallowing lithium batteries.
The website warns parents that saliva triggers current when the battery is stuck in the child\'s throat.
Once the combustion reaction begins, it can continue even after the battery is taken out.
This is not a rare accident.
Each year, more than 3,500 cases of Button Battery swallowing of various sizes and types are reported to the United StatesS.
Poisoning control center
Between 2006 and 2010, cases of children who died or were seriously injured increased by four times as more household items now contain lithium batteries.
Wright is telling her story because when she says she talks to her parents, they don\'t know how dangerous it is.
\"I feel like we want to do that if we can stop another child from going through this,\" she said . \".
It\'s dangerous to swallow batteries, but the biggest danger is coins.
\"They are small enough to be swallowed, but big enough to get stuck,\" she added . \".
Brenden was lucky.
Many children need to be hospitalized and operated for several months.
Every year, some children die from swallowing lithium batteries.
In some cases, parents do not even know that the child has swallowed the battery until the child is ill.
When the battery is found, it has burned a hole through the esophagus or stomach.
So Wright was very pleased and grateful.
\"When you read that it can burn a hole in two hours in real time, I can\'t believe we left him here, and he started to try to walk again and do his normal thing, \"she said.
Rsimone @ township enterprises.
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